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FROM THIS EPISODE

The Supreme Court handed down a decision that could limit states’ rights to regulate abortion for years to come. In a 5-3 decision Monday, the justices struck down Texas’ strict anti-abortion laws. What happens next?

Also, laws similar to those in Texas have led to abortion clinic closures in many other states and to a rise in women performing their own abortions, often using a drug which was originally developed to treat ulcers.

Then, investigators are still trying to figure out exactly what happened when violence broke out Sunday at a white supremacist rally in Sacramento. What is known is that the rally was planned by a white nationalist group called the Traditionalist Workers Party, and the group’s leader, Matthew Heimbach, is being called the new face of the white supremacy movement.

Next, how the NRA managed to shift the gun conversation from hunters’ rights to self-defense.

And finally, the BET Awards got political Sunday, and NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans says it’s about time.

Producers:
Matt Holzman
Anna Scott
Jolie Myers
Christian Bordal
Sarah Sweeney

Supreme Court Strikes Down Texas Abortion Restriction Laws 8 MIN, 33 SEC

The Supreme Court handed down a decision that could limit states’ rights to regulate abortion for years to come. In a 5-3 decision Monday, the justices struck down Texas’ strict anti-abortion laws. Now the door is open to challenge similar laws across the country. What will happen in other states? And what happens next in Texas, where nearly two dozen abortion clinics have closed in the past three years?

Guests:
Lisa McElroy, Drexel University (@ProfLisaMcElroy)

Clinic Closures Have Led to a Rise in Self-Induced Abortions 7 MIN, 57 SEC

Many states aside from Texas have adopted laws that have restricted access to abortion. In 23 other states, abortion clinics must become certified as surgical centers. And in 10 other states, doctors who perform abortions are required to have admitting privileges at local hospitals. That has led to the closure of so many clinics that women have begun performing their own abortions. Many of these women are using a drug called misoprostol, which was originally developed to treat ulcers.

Guests:
Phoebe Zerwick, Journalist (@PhoebeZerwick)

The New Face of White Supremacy in America 8 MIN, 4 SEC

Investigators are still trying to figure out exactly what happened when violence broke out Sunday at a white supremacist rally in Sacramento. Ten people were stabbed or beaten, two critically. What is known is that about 30 white supremacists gathered in front of the state capitol building to demonstrate. They were met by about 400 counter-demonstrators when fighting broke out. The rally was planned by a white nationalist group called the Traditionalist Workers Party, and the group’s leader is 25-year-old Matthew Heimbach, who is being called the new face of the white supremacy movement.

Guests:
Ryan Lenz, Journalist (@LenzSPLC)

NRA and Another Spike in Gun Sales After Another Mass Shooting 13 MIN, 44 SEC

Just as happened after other mass shootings in the United States, gun sales spiked after 49 people were killed in a gay nightclub in Orlando this month. The reason most often given for the spike is that gun owners become worried that the government will take some action to restrict gun sales, and so they decide to stock up. Their worry has been unfounded, since Congress has repeatedly failed to enact gun control legislation. And after this latest mass shooting, it’s more of the same, thanks to the National Rifle Association. Evan Osnos has looked into the history of the NRA’s clout and he writes about how the group managed to shift the conversation from hunters’ rights to self-defense for the latest issue of the New Yorker.

Guests:
Evan Osnos, New Yorker magazine (@eosnos)

BET Awards Gets Political 50 MIN, 10 SEC

Beyonce and Kendrick Lamar wowed the crowd with a joint performance at the BET Awards Sunday. Tributes to Muhammad Ali and Prince moved the audience and viewers at home. But actor Jesse Williams, who played Dr. Jackson Avery on ABC’s Grey’s Anatomy, stole the show with an eloquent civil rights speech after accepting the Humanitarian Award. “If you have no interest in equal rights for black people then do not make suggestions to those to those who do. Sit down,” he said. The annual event celebrating African Americans in the arts and entertainment is consistently the highest rated awards show on cable, and it’s BET’s highest rated show.

Guests:
Eric Deggans, NPR (@Deggans)

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