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Photo: Opposition supporters hold placards depicting Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro reading: "No more dictatorship. Out Maduro" and "No more dictatorship", during a rally against Maduro's government in Caracas, Venezuela April 1, 2017. (Christian Veron/Reuters)

Producers:
Sáša Woodruff
Yael Even Or
Luke Vander Ploeg

Gas attack in Syria kills dozens, including children 6 MIN, 32 SEC

On Friday, the Trump Administration said regime change in Syria was no longer a US objective.  But today, it's blaming President Assad for a chemical weapons attack that killed at least 58 people, including many children.

Maya Gebeily, who is based in Beirut for AFP, says the Assad government categorically denied the attack and pointed the finger at rebel groups.

Guests:
Maya Gebeily, Agence France-Presse (@GebeilyM)

Are Venezuela's troubles the legacy of populism? 33 MIN, 56 SEC

Twenty years ago, the late Hugo Chavez promised to save democracy in Venezuela. Today, Venezuela is moving toward a dictatorship, with the opposition divided against authoritarian President Nicolás Maduro. Late last year there were massive street protests, and this weekend the Supreme Court stripped the legislature of its power. When the rest of the world took notice, that ruling was mostly reversed -- but economic depression continues, and the government refuses food or medical aid. We hear what life is like in the nation with the world’s largest oil reserves -- and hear a debate about how it got that way.

Guests:
Andrew Rosati, Bloomberg (@andrewrosati)
Daniel Lansberg-Rodríguez, Northwestern University / Foreign Policy magazine (@DLansberg)
Mark Weisbrot, Center for Economic and Policy Research (@markweisbrot)
John Walsh, WOLA (@WOLA_org)

More:
Rosati on Venezuela top court reversing decision to strip power from opposition-led National Assembly
Bloomberg on why Latin America is moving away from populism (video)
Lansberg-Rodríguez on why China should stop supporting Venezuela
WOLA on dissolution of Venezuelan National Assembly, need for multilateral diplomacy
WOLA on Latin America's response to Venezuela's deepening political crisis

Uncovering a secret meeting to establish Trump-Putin back channel 10 MIN, 4 SEC

Erik Prince was the founder of Blackwater, a security firm that became a symbol of US abuses in Iraq; several Blackwater guards were convicted of killing civilians. Prince is also the brother of Betsy DeVos, President Trump's Secretary of Education. Now, he's been named by the Washington Post as part of a secret meeting with a Russian official close to Vladimir Putin with the goal of curtailing Russia's relationship with Iran. Greg Miller co-wrote the story.

Guests:
Greg Miller, Washington Post (@gregpmiller)

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