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FROM THIS EPISODE

America's last massive civil disturbance took place in Los Angeles in 1992, but urban decay continues in many cities. What does it take to trigger a riot? Why do they often occur during wartime? What's the state of American cities today? Also, the global battle against AIDS and, on Reporter's Notebook, despite Turkey's tradition of secular government, voters support a party with Islamic leanings.


Photo: STF/AFP/Getty Images

Producers:
Vanessa Romo
Andrea Brody
Katie Cooper

Main Topic The History and Possible Future of Urban Violence in America 36 MIN, 4 SEC

Forty years ago, widespread violence broke out in Detroit and Newark, just as it had two years before in Rochester, Philadelphia and Los Angeles. Civil unrest caused deaths, injuries and property damage in other cities during the next few years, but Los Angeles, which still showed scars from the Watts Riots of 1965, broke all the records in 1992. Symptoms of urban decay include unemployment, lack of affordable housing, racism and police abuse. What can be learned from past outbreaks? What does it take to trigger a riot and what's the state of American cities today?

Guests:
Max Herman, Professor of Sociology at Rutgers University
Peter Dreier, Occidental College (@PeterDreier)
Michael Katz, Professor of History, University of Pennsylvania
Joel Kotkin, Chapman University

Reporter's Notebook Turkey's Islamic-Rooted Ruling Party Wins Decisive Victory 6 MIN, 34 SEC

Since the government of Turkey was founded in 1923, it has been rigorously secular. The military has enforced that tradition by deposing four elected governments. Yesterday's election was forced by a secular establishment unhappy with the religious leanings of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan. But far from punishing Erdogan for his Islamic orientation, Turkish voters gave his AK party 47 percent of the vote to just 21 percent for the largest secular party. Yigal Schleifer reports from Istanbul for the Christian Science Monitor.

Guests:
Yigal Schleifer, Correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor

Making News Top Bush Advisor Says World is Losing AIDS Fight 6 MIN, 11 SEC

At an international conference in Sydney, Australia today, President Bush's top advisor on HIV/AIDS said the world is losing the battle against that virus. Donald McNeil, Jr. is science reporter for the New York Times.

Guests:
Donald McNeil, Jr., Science Reporter for the New York Times

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