Propositions 21 and 22 and Ballot-Box Budgeting
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Propositions 21 and 22 and Ballot-Box Budgeting

California's 278 state parks have been designated "endangered places."  Will Prop 21 save the state's so-called "crown jewels"… or is it a cynical ploy to restore the "car tax? Prop 22 prevents the Governor and the legislature from seizing money earmarked for cities and counties and spending it on state services. We hear the pros and cons of both measures, as well as why measures like these ever get on the ballot. On our rebroadcast of today's To the Point, massive foreclosure fraud threatens America's economic recovery. We hear about untrained "robo-signers" approving 500 foreclosures a day, and we raise a disturbing question: who really owns the mortgage on your home?

Banner image: Auburn State Park

Main Topic

Ballot-Box Budgeting on the November Ballot ()

Proposition 21 would establish an $18 surcharge on vehicles when they’re registered every year, commercial vehicles and trailers excepted. The fee would raise $500 million a year to be spent on 278 state parks. The purpose of Prop 22 is to prevent the state from seizing money earmarked for cities, counties and various transportation projects and spending it instead on state services. Prop 21 is an initiative statute which could be changed. Prop 22 is a constitutional amendment, which could only be changed by the voters.  Both are examples of what’s called “ballot-box budgeting” because they would limit the discretion of elected officials to spend money as circumstances require. 


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Main Topic

Robo-Signers, Foreclosures and the Battered Housing Market ()

More than 100,000 home mortgages were foreclosed in the month of September, a national record. At the same time, foreclosure fraud is so widespread it threatens economic recovery.

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Which Way L.A.? is made possible in part by the Ralph M. Parsons Foundation, the Nathan Cummings Foundation, and the John Randolph Haynes and Dora Haynes Foundation, which supports study and research into policy issues of the Los Angeles region.

 

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