Katharine Hayhoe

Texas Tech University

Guest

Katharine Hayhoe is Associate Professor of Political Science at Texas Tech University and Director of its Climate Science Center.

Katharine Hayhoe on KCRW

We often hear about the huge problems involving climate change: melting glaciers, rising sea levels, plus intensifying hurricanes, tornadoes, and other weather patterns.

Fighting climate change in our daily lives

We often hear about the huge problems involving climate change: melting glaciers, rising sea levels, plus intensifying hurricanes, tornadoes, and other weather patterns.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Donald Trump's election has been a profound shock to scientists, environmentalists and the clean-energy industry.

Just don't call it 'climate change'

Donald Trump's election has been a profound shock to scientists, environmentalists and the clean-energy industry.

from To the Point

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Absolute immunity, executive privilege, crony privilege?

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Climate change is an existential crisis. If Americans cut just one hamburger from their diet every week, it would be like taking 10 million cars off the road every year. After cutting energy use, less meat and more plant-based food add up to the easiest--and healthiest--way to reduce your carbon footprint. From the land and water needed to raise feed and the methane produced at the end of digestion, “Cattle are actually mini fossil-fuel, greenhouse gas producers.” So says Sujatha Bergen, head of health campaigns at the NRDC. As her title suggests, eliminating beef from your diet--in addition to pork and lamb-- is also better for you. She explains the trade-offs for helping to reduce climate change and says, “Starting with your fork is much less daunting for many people.”

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