Warren Olney

Warren Olney

Host, To the Point, Which Way, L.A.?

Warren Olney is the host and executive producer of To the Point and To the Point’s Climate Change Update. They are podcasts based on 50 years of experience as a journalist in print, commercial TV and public broadcasting. He formerly hosted both the local focused Which Way, LA? and the nationally syndicated To the Point on 89.9 KCRW Santa Monica.

Olney and his programs have been honored with nearly 40 national, regional and local awards for broadcast excellence. In 2012, Olney received the 2012 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Radio and Television News Association of Southern California for his broad achievements in television news, as well as his storied career over 20 years on public radio, both locally and nationally. He has been awarded the Golden Mike Award for "Best Public Affairs Program," and WWLA was honored with the Los Angeles Press Club's Southern California Journalism Award for Best Talk/Public Affairs Show. Olney was named Best Radio Journalist of the Year at the 2001 Los Angeles Press Club's Southern California Journalism Awards.

WWLA was also named as Best Talk/Public Affairs Show during the same awards ceremony. He is the only person to have been twice named "Broadcast Journalist of the Year" — for his work in both radio and television — by the Society of Professional Journalists, Los Angeles. He is the recipient of Emmy Awards for reporting and anchoring, and Golden Mikes for investigative reporting.

Concurrent with his hosting duties on Which Way, LA?, from June 1999 to September 2000, he served as co-anchor of KCET-TV's Life & Times Tonight, a nightly public affairs show. Olney was a television news reporter and anchor from 1966 to 1991, working in Washington, DC, Sacramento, and Los Angeles. Throughout his career, he covered local, state, and national politics, including presidential primaries, nominating conventions and inaugurals, and superpower summit meetings in Washington and Geneva. His special projects and investigations have focused on crime, science, the environment, among other subjects. Overseas assignments took him to Europe, Asia, and Central America.

He also served as a print reporter for the Sacramento Bee (California) and the Newport News Daily Press (Virginia). Olney's interviews, book reviews, articles, and columns have appeared in the Los Angeles Times, the Village Voice, Los Angeles magazine, and California Journal, among other publications. He frequently speaks on politics, the media, the evolving character of Southern California, and other subjects, and is often called on to moderate public panels on numerous topics. At the University of Southern California, Olney developed and taught "Broadcast Journalism," a laboratory course for graduate and undergraduate students, from 1976-1982.

As an actor, Olney has appeared in numerous feature films, including Crimson Tide, The Fisher King, and Higher Learning, as well as other feature and television productions. Olney received his BA in English, magna cum laude, from Amherst College (Massachusetts) and became a member of Phi Beta Kappa. He has four children and five grandchildren. He is married to Marsha Temple, a former attorney at law, now Executive Director of the Integrated Recovery Network, a nonprofit helping the homeless mentally ill to find housing, treatment and jobs.

Warren Olney on KCRW

What are the risks of keeping the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant open? And an atheist and Muslim agree on what happens when people find religion through politics.

Diablo Canyon: Can the nuclear plant work safely for 10 more years?

What are the risks of keeping the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant open? And an atheist and Muslim agree on what happens when people find religion through politics.

from To the Point

Does the news really have to be all that bad, or does our addiction to catastrophe drive outlets to deliver what sells? How might today’s media be fixed?

Is catastrophic news coverage fit for human consumption?

Does the news really have to be all that bad, or does our addiction to catastrophe drive outlets to deliver what sells? How might today’s media be fixed?

from To the Point

What to expect of the Supreme Court’s decision to ease conceal-carry restrictions, Biden’s new gun safety law, and the Sandy Hook lawsuit?

SCOTUS strikes down concealed-carry law. Is gun control in danger?

What to expect of the Supreme Court’s decision to ease conceal-carry restrictions, Biden’s new gun safety law, and the Sandy Hook lawsuit?

from To the Point

More from KCRW

Guelaguetza means offering or gift in Zapotec, an indigenous language of Mexico. It’s also the name of the biggest celebration for Oaxacans in LA, which is set for August 14.

from Greater LA

Author Sam Knight tells the true story of the British psychiatrist and London science journalist who established a Premonitions Bureau to test the power of ESP and predict future…

from Life Examined

KCRW’s Global Beat is a series highlighting emerging artists from around the world.

from KCRW’s Global Beat

NPR’s Betto Arcos weaves a tale of isolation vs. illumination, symphonic-pop in technicolor, and the shape of Mexican jazz to come.

from KCRW’s Global Beat

Move over Cinco de Mayo, this is the day Mexicans really celebrate — Mexican Independence Day (Las Fiestas Patrias)! Get into Global Beat, and get ready for El Grito.

from KCRW’s Global Beat

Former Mideast CIA operative John Kiriakou discusses his recent trip covering Biden in Saudi Arabia and what he’s learned about America’s “special relationship” with the country.

from Scheer Intelligence

Katrina vanden Heuvel, editorial director and publisher of The Nation, remembers the Russian leader—whom she called a friend—as a committed pro-peace thinker, on this week’s “Scheer…

from Scheer Intelligence

Kieran Setiya describes his midlife malaise and why hitting 40 can be challenging.

from Life Examined

KCRW’s Global Beat is a series highlighting emerging artists from around the world.

from KCRW’s Global Beat