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Photo: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) walks from the Senate Chamber after eliminating the filibuster rule against Supreme Court nominees, on Capitol Hill in Washington, April 6, 2017. (Joshua Roberts/Reuters)

Nunes recusal is latest intelligence shakeup 6 MIN, 32 SEC

California Republican Devin Nunes has recused himself as Chair of the House Intelligence Committee while it investigates Russian interference in last year's election. He's also being investigated himself, by the Ethics Committee. Ali Watkins, national security reporter for BuzzFeed, says Nunes is being investigated for possible revelation of classified information.

Guests:
Ali Watkins, Politico (@AliWatkins)

More:
Schiff on Nunes recusal, Intelligence Committee

Another blow to bipartisanship 33 MIN, 52 SEC

In the Senate, minority party rights have been protected by requiring that some measures need 60 votes, instead of just 51, in order to pass. But over the years, both parties have eroded that rule — especially regarding judicial confirmations — and this week it’s happening again. Senate Democrats challenged Republicans to put up or shut up today by denying the 60 votes needed to confirm Neil Gorsuch to the US Supreme Court. Republican John McCain said, "Someday we will regret what we are about to do." But he still joined fellow Republicans in eliminating a protection for minority party rights in the Senate. Once again, a supposedly hallowed tradition is being abandoned in the interests of politics. What will approval of President Trump’s first appointment to the US Supreme Court mean in the long run for both political parties? 

More:
Senate Majority Leader McConnell on allowing an up-or-down vote on Gorsuch
Dennis on Democrats choosing path on Gorsuch that could change Washington
Jawando on five reasons to save the 60-vote threshold for SCOTUS nominees
Tobin on Democrats' filibuster foolhardiness
Politico on Trump's back channel to Justice Kennedy

Mar-a-Lago diplomacy and free publicity 10 MIN, 6 SEC


Secret Service agents tidy-up President Trump's limousines
as they wait for him at Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach, Florida
Photo by Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

President Trump's summit meeting with China's President Xi Jinping starts today at Mar-a-Lago — Mr. Trump's ultra-luxurious club for members only, now being called "the Winter White House." It's a daily subject of extensive news coverage — and free publicity. That raises ethics questions and tarnishes the conduct of American diplomacy according to Robert Weissman. He's president of Public Citizen, the nonprofit government watchdog founded by Ralph Nader.

Guests:
Robert Weissman, President, Public Citizen (@public_citizen)

More:
NY Times on first family needs straining the secret service
NY Times on Mar-a-Lago's exclusive members list

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